What do we believe?

Unitarian Universalism is a covenantal faith rather than a creedal faith, meaning that we are not united by a set of shared beliefs but rather by how we treat one another. Covenant is what it means to love alike. Covenant is people making promises to themselves, each other, and the spirit of life (what some call and experience as God, though you need not name it that way).

Our promises are guided by our 8 Principles and 5 Jagged Rocks and are informed through 6 named sources. Learn more below!

Our Eight Principles
We affirm Eight Principles which we hold as strong values and moral guides:

1st Principle: The inherent worth and dignity of every person;
2nd Principle: Justice, equity and compassion in human relations;
3rd Principle: Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations;
4th Principle: A free and responsible search for truth and meaning;
5th Principle: The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large;
6th Principle: The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all;
7th Principle: Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part.

8th Principle: On May 23, 2021, Foothills Unitarian voted to adopt the 8th Principle, which states: We, the member congregations of the Unitarian Universalist Association, covenant to affirm and promote: journeying toward spiritual wholeness by working to build a diverse multicultural Beloved Community by our actions that accountably dismantle racisms and other oppressions in ourselves and our institutions.

The Five Jagged Rocks

The Five Jagged Rocks are an evolving articulation of Unitarian Universalist living practice:

The Six Sources of Unitarian Universalism

We believe religious inspiration is not confined to the pages of a single sacred text but rather can be found the world over. This breadth of religious inspiration is at the heart of our Unitarian Universalist values. We can hold our life experiences and biggest questions in a meaningful way by weaving together our personal understanding of the six sources of Unitarian Universalism. 

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